Tag: mountains

10 Highest Mountains in Slovenia

All but one of 10 highest mountains in Slovenia are to be found in the Julian Alps, within the boundary of the Triglav National Park, the sole exception being Grintovec, the highest mountain in the Kamnik-Savinja Alps.

Many of these great summits can be reached by the walker who has a head for heights and enjoys some easy scrambling. Some are a little harder and self-belaying equipment is recommended. The ascents of many of Slovenia’s mountains can be made much easier by staying overnight in a nearby mountain hut.

Some photos are missing – we will try to fill these gaps on our next trip!

  1. Triglav, Slovenia's highest mountain
    Triglav, 2,864m

    1.Triglav – 2,864m. Latitude/Longitude – 46.378 / 13.837.

    Triglav is the highest mountain in Slovenia.  But it is more than that!  It seems that Triglav’s summit is almost a place of pilgimage for the Slovenes – in fact we have heard that only once you have climbed it, can you be considered a true Slovenian!  The mountain has pride of place on the nation’s flag which illustrates just how important it is!  It was first climbed in 1778 and there is a statue commerating the four climber’s ascent in Ribčev Laz.  Click on the link to read about our first ascent of Triglav that we made in September 2009.

  2. Škrlatica – 2,740m. Latitude/Longitude – 46.433 / 13.821.

    Škrlatica lies between the Pišnica and Vrata valleys and is considered to be a difficult climb. The first ascent was made in 1880 by Julius Kugy, accompanied by the guide Andrej Komac and Matija Kravanja. (Pictured below)

  3. Mangrt or Mangart – 2,678m. Latitude/Longitude – 46.442 / 13.661.

    Mangrt lies on the Italian border, north-west of Bovec. The 1300m North Wall is popular with climbers. The first ascent was made in 1794 by naturalist Francis Joseph Hannibal Hohenwart.

  4. Visoki Rokav – 2,646m. Latitude/Longitude – 46.435 / 13.828.

    Visoki Rokav is the neighbouring, but slightly lower, peak of Škrlatica. It appears that there are no waymarked/protected routes to it’s summit. (Pictured below)

  5. Jalovec and Kugy Monument
    Jalovec, 2,645m and Kugy Monument

    5. Jalovec, 2,645m – Latitude/Longitude – 46.416 / 13.683.

    Jalovec – a classic looking mountain (the Matterhorn of Slovenia) at the head of the Soča Valley and above Zadnja Trenta, from where it can be climbed (the approach from the Planica valley to the north is perhaps easier). There is a beautiful view of this peak from Sleme, on Walk 10. Karl Wurmb and two guides, Crnuta and Strgulc, were the first to climb it in 1875.

  6. Razor, 2601m
    Razor, 2601m

    Razor, 2601m – Latitude/Longitude – 46.412 / 13.792.

    Razor is well seen from Trenta in the Soča Valley and from Kranjska Gora on the north side of the Vršič Pass. This view is from the ruined Italian barracks of Morbegna, just to the SW of Triglav. Referred to as The Royal of Julian Alps by Kugy, Razor was first climbed by Otto Sendtner in 1842. (Also pictured below)

  7. Kanjavec
    Kanjavec, 2,568m

    Razor, 2601m – Latitude/Longitude – 46.36 / 13.807.

    Kanjavec is part of the Triglav group lying just to the SW. There is a protected route from Dolič but it easily climbed from Hribarice to the south (the route that we took on our mountain backpack in the Julian Alps. This view is from the mountain hut, Tržaška Koča na Doliču.

  8. Grintovec – 2,558m. Latitude/Longitude – 46.359 / 14.537.

    Grintovec is the highest Slovenian peak outside of the Julian Alps. It belongs to the Kamnik-Savinja Alps which lie to the north of Kamnik. The botanist Scopoli made the first recorded ascent in 1759.

  9. Kranjska Gora, Slovenia
    Prisonik (R), 2547m, Razor (L)

    Prisonik – 2547m. Latitude/Longitude – 46.426 / 13.774.

    Prisojnik, also called Prisank, dominates the skyline when looking south over Kranjska Gora. It is most easily climbed from Vršič along a relatively easy and secured route. The mountain is well known for its two natural windows and the amazing “Girl’s Face”, Ajdovska Deklica. (Also pictured below)

  10. Rž,
    Rž, 2,538m

    Rž, 2,538m. Latitude/Longitude – 46.382 / 13.859.

    Rž is part of the Triglav group and lies to the east. It is most easily reached from Kredarica but it seems it is not a peak for the walker as there is no easy or even secured route to the top. Perhaps one of the best views is from near Dom Valentina Staniča pod Triglavom.

View of Prisojnok and Razor (L) plus Škrlatica and Visoki Rokav (R) from Morbegna in the Julian Alps, Slovenia.
View of Prisojnok and Razor (L) plus Škrlatica and Visoki Rokav (R) from Morbegna in the Julian Alps, Slovenia.

Latitude/Longitude co-ordinates are sourced from and link to web-pages belonging to www.geonames.org.

41. Podolševa and Govca

Walk 41 – a walk from Podolševa to Govca on the Austrian border, from a Walking Guide to Slovenia.

The cave Potočka Zijavka
The cave Potočka Zijavka

One of our favourite walks! A wonderful mountain ridge walk with a 360degree panorama along the Austrian border.  The route also passes the cave Potoćka Zijavka where, in 1928 bones of the cave bear and tools belonging to Stone Age hunters were found.

Start/Finish – Podolševa

Summit cross on Govca
Summit cross on Govca

Distance – 10km/6.3miles

Height gain – approx 800m

Time – 4h44min

Grade – strenuous; mainly on good mountain paths, with a very steep descent from the ridge.

Recommended map – is the 1:50 000 Kamniško-Savinjske Alpe map, published by PZS

Equipment – Walking boots, walking sticks and a torch if you want to explore the Potoćka Zijavka cave. See our clothing and walking equipment page for more recommendations.

Refreshments on route – none

Updates to the 2019, 5th EditionThere are no updates

Public transport – There is no public transport to this walk.

Nearest Towns/Villages – Accommodation is a little limited in Luče. It has no hotels, but several Tourist Farms offer accommodation and there is a small campsite, with excellent facilities, just to the north of the village. Solčava has even less choice but in Logarska Dolina you will find hotels and Tourist Farms. The Govc-Vršnik Tourist Farm in Robanov Kot offers accommodation. See the Luče Tourist Information Centre and Logarska Dolina websites for more details.

Podolševa and the Kamnik-Savinja Alps
Podolševa and the Kamnik-Savinja Alps

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40. Slap Rinka, Logarska Dolina

Walk 40 – a walk from Slap Rinka in Logarska Dolina, from a Walking Guide to Slovenia.

The Kamnik-Savinja Alps from above Slap Rinka
The Kamnik-Savinja Alps from above Slap Rinka

This walk explores Logarska Dolina beyond the road end, visiting Slap Rinka and the source of the Savinja River. Beyond here we climb up into a small amphitheatre of jagged peaks in the Kamnik-Savinja Alps. For the adventurous we describe an alternative descent.  There is only a very limited bus service to Slap Rinka (details below), but this walk could be easily added on to Walk 39 through Logarska Dolina.

Start/Finish – Slap Rinka car park

Magnificent beech woods in Logarska Dolina
Magnificent beech woods in Logarska Dolina

Distance – 3.3km/2miles

Height gain – approx 500m

Time – 2h09min

Grade – moderate; on good mountain paths, with an initial steep ascent of 400m

Recommended map – is the 1:50 000 Kamniško-Savinjske Alpe map, published by PZS

Equipment – Walking boots, walking sticks. See our clothing and walking equipment page for more recommendations.

Refreshments on route – there is a snack bar at the start/finish and beside Slap Rinka. In season, drinks and basic meals are available from Okrešlju Dom.

Updates to the 2019, 5th EditionThere are no updates

Public transport – There is a regular bus service from Luče to the entrance of Logarska Dolina and a summer service to Slap Rinka and the start of this walk – check the “Shuttle Transfer” link here.

Nearest Towns/Villages – Accommodation is a little limited in Luče. It has no hotels, but several Tourist Farms offer accommodation and there is a small campsite, with excellent facilities, just to the north of the village. Solčava has even less choice but in Logarska Dolina you will find hotels and Tourist Farms. The Govc-Vršnik Tourist Farm in Robanov Kot offers accommodation. See the Luče Tourist Information Centre and Logarska Dolina websites for more details.

Slap Rinka in Logarska Dolina
Slap Rinka in Logarska Dolina

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39. Logarska Dolina

Walk 39 – a walk in Logarska Dolina, from a Walking Guide to Slovenia.

Logarska Dolina
Logarska Dolina

The valley of Logarska Dolina lies at the Upper Savinja Valley and is one of the most beautiful glacial valleys in Europe. Green pastures, woods and the mighty peaks of the Kamnik-Savinja Alps harmonise to form a perfect scene. Our walk leads you through this stunning valley.

Start/Finish – entrance to Logarska Dolina

Logarska Dolina in autumn
Logarska Dolina in autumn

Distance – 15km/9.4miles

Height gain – approx 220m

Time – 3h51min

Grade – easy; mainly on good paths

Recommended map – is the 1:50 000 Kamniško-Savinjske Alpe map, published by PZS

Equipment – Walking shoes. See our clothing and walking equipment page for more recommendations.

Refreshments on route – there are several inns on route and a snack bar at the Slap Rinka car park

Updates to the 2019, 5th EditionThere are no updates

Public transport – There is a regular bus service from Luče to the entrance of Logarska Dolina.

Nearest Towns/Villages – Accommodation is a little limited in Luče. It has no hotels, but several Tourist Farms offer accommodation and there is a small campsite, with excellent facilities, just to the north of the village. Solčava has even less choice but in Logarska Dolina you will find hotels and Tourist Farms. The Govc-Vršnik Tourist Farm in Robanov Kot offers accommodation. See the Luče Tourist Information Centre and Logarska Dolina websites for more details.

Logarska Dolina
Logarska Dolina

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38. Robanov Kot

Walk 38 – a walk in Robanov Kot, near Luče, from a Walking Guide to Slovenia.

Robanov Kot
Robanov Kot

The valley of Robanov Kot lies off the Upper Savinja Valley and is often bypassed by visitors eager to reach the neighbouring Logarska Dolina. The lack of a road means it is accessible to walkers only and, as a result, is a peaceful spot in which to while away a few hours. The towering peaks of the Kamnik-Savinja Alps are a perfect backdrop.

Start/Finish – Robanov Kot

Wayside shrine near the entrance to Robanov Kot
Wayside shrine near the entrance to Robanov Kot

Distance – 9km/5.6miles

Height gain – approx 220m

Time – 1h50min

Grade – easy; on well-surfaced tracks

Recommended map – is the 1:50 000 Kamniško-Savinjske Alpe map, published by PZS

Equipment – Walking shoes. See our clothing and walking equipment page for more recommendations.

Refreshments on route – available at Govc-Uršnik and, in season, at Robanova Planina.

Updates to the 2019, 5th EditionThere are no updates.

Public transport – There is a regular bus service from Luče to the entrance of Robaonov Kot, which is 750m from the start of the walk.

Nearest Towns/Villages – Accommodation is a little limited in Luče. It has no hotels, but several Tourist Farms offer accommodation and there is a small campsite, with excellent facilities, just to the north of the village. Solčava has even less choice but in Logarska Dolina you will find hotels and Tourist Farms. The Govc-Vršnik Tourist Farm in Robanov Kot offers accommodation. See the Luče Tourist Information Centre and Logarska Dolina websites for more details.

Govc farm in Robanov Kot
Govc farm in Robanov Kot

Please leave a comment below, or contact us, if you have some up to date information that you think might be useful or any suggestions to improve Slovenia-walking.

37. Kamniški Vrh

Walk 37 – a walk on Kamniški Vrh, near Kamnik, from a Walking Guide to Slovenia.

On the summit ridge of Kamniški Vrh
On the summit ridge of Kamniški Vrh

Kamniški Vrh is a superb vantage point with views over the town of Kamnik and the surrounding countryside. Our circular route over the summit explores the sunny southern side of this mountain and is full of variety.

Start/Finish – Start of the track to Slevo, near Stahovica

WWII Partisan memorial below Kamniški vrh

Distance – 7.5km/4.7miles

Height gain – approx 800m

Time – 3h03min

Grade – strenuous; on good paths, but with a steep ascent of 700m.

Recommended map – is the 1:50 000 Kamniško-Savinjske Alpe map, published by PZS

Equipment – Walking boots, walking sticks. See our clothing and walking equipment page for more recommendations.

Refreshments on route – none

Updates to the 2019, 5th EditionThere are no updates

Public transport – There is a regular bus service from Kamnik to Stahovica, which is 2.8km/1.7miles from the start of the walk.

Nearest Town/Village – Kamnik. A bustling town but with a limited range of accommodation. There is one hotel and apartments are available. There are also rooms, a Youth Hostel and two Camping Sites – Camp Resnik (500m from the town centre) and one beside the Velika Planina Cable Car. Kamnik has an excellent range of shops and places to eat.  See the Kamnik Tourist Information Centre website for more details.

**Book Youth Hostel Pod Skalo, Kamnik, Slovenia with Hostelbookers**

Kamniški Vrh summit ridge
Kamniški Vrh summit ridge

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36. Velika Planina

Walk 36 – a walk on Velika Planina, from a Walking Guide to Slovenia.

Wooden shepherd houses on Velika Planina
Wooden shepherd houses on Velika Planina

One of Slovenia’s walking highlights! A day out on Velika Planina offers easy walking through the summer pastures and the herdsmen’s traditional wooden huts plus stunning views to the Kamniško-Savinjske Alps.

Start/Finish – Start at the Velika Planina Cable Car, finish at Stahovica

Walkers shrine at Stahovica
Walkers shrine at Stahovica

Distance – 12.5km/7.8miles

Height gain – approx 250m

Time – 4h10min

Grade – moderate-strenuous; on good tracks and paths, starting with an ascent of 210m but ending with a descent of 1100m. (We also write up a shorter walk of 10km/6.3miles graded easy).

Recommended map – is the 1:50 000 Kamniško-Savinjske Alpe map, published by PZS

Equipment – Walking boots, walking sticks. See our clothing and walking equipment page for more recommendations.

Refreshments on route – available from the various lodging houses. Open throughout the summer and at weekends out of season. See the Velika Planina website and click on the ‘Food and Lodging’ link for more details.

Updates to the 2019, 5th EditionThere are no updates

Public transport – There is a limited bus service to the Velika Planina Cable Car.  A more regular service runs to Stahovica.

Nearest Town/Village – Kamnik. A bustling town but with a limited range of accommodation. There is one hotel and apartments are available. There are also rooms, a Youth Hostel and two Camping Sites – Camp Resnik (500m from the town centre) and one beside the Velika Planina Cable Car.  Kamnik has an excellent range of shops and places to eat.  See the Kamnik Tourist Information Centre website for more details.

**Book Youth Hostel Pod Skalo, Kamnik, Slovenia with Hostelbookers**

Velika Planina, near Kamnik
Velika Planina, near Kamnik

Please leave a comment below, or contact us, if you have some up to date information that you think might be useful or any suggestions to improve Slovenia-walking.

A 12 Day Walking Tour in the Julian Alps of Slovenia

Triglav, Slovenia's highest mountain
Triglav, Slovenia’s highest mountain

In the autumn of 2009 David and I completed one of the most exciting and exhilarating walking trips we have ever done, a grand walking tour in the Julian Alps. Since our first visit to Slovenia in 2001 we had always dreamed of climbing Triglav and incorporating this challenge into a circular walk and sleeping in the mountain huts in the Julian Alps. It was a walk that we will remember and cherish all our lives.

Zasavska Koča na Prehodavcih
Zasavska Koča na Prehodavcih

Slovenians are proud of their hiking prowess and the mountain huts enable those who love the “Great Outdoors” to stay for days or weeks amidst the high peaks. Huts is a bad translation of koča or dom as these buildings provide clean accommodation, including bedding, warmth and good basic food. There is always a warm welcome and, even with only a few words of Slovenian, it is easy to communicate. The huts are run by various walking clubs and usually there are 2 or 3 people in charge who spend the summer months cheerfully catering to the needs of the hungry, weary walker. Generally there is never more than 5 hours walking between the huts.

With many routes to choose from and a choice of accommodation we found it easy to plan a tour that allowed us to start and finish from the same place and, what was truly magical, we could see where we had come from and where we were heading many times on the journey. As everything you are going to need has to be carried on your back, careful preparation is essential. In addition to the usual necessary walking equipment only a little extra is needed in order to stay in the huts. Just the basics are needed in the washing department as water is very limited, so don’t expect a shower! A torch is recommended for use in the dormitories at night, but you will have one in your pack anyway. Carry a spare set of clothes to wear in the evening and enough cash in your pocket to pay for your bed and meals and you are set to go.

Day One

Knafelc waymark
Knafelc waymark

Our holiday started with a pleasant walk from Ribčev Laz, passing by Lake Bohinj, to Stara Fužina, from where we climbed up the well way-marked but steep path to Planina Uskovnica. A quick bite of lunch, sitting in the warm sunshine beside the pretty chapel there, was followed by a long traversing walk, mainly through trees, around the head of the Voje Valley where we met the main path from Rudno Polje to Triglav. We were clear of the trees and we would not walk in them again for the next week. Having made our height for the day it was then an easy traverse around to our first hut, Vodnikov Dom at 1817m.

Unusually, no one in the hut seemed to speak any English, but with our very basic Slovenian we had soon secured a room for the night and had a refreshing cup of tea in our hands. Supper was vegetable soup and bread and more tea, soon followed by an early night and falling to sleep to the sound of cow-bells drifting up from Velo polje just below.

Day One stats – 6 1/2hrs walking, approx 1400m of ascent.

Day Two

On the way to Dom Valentina Staniča pod Triglavom
On the way to Dom Valentina Staniča pod Triglavom

Breakfast was two fried eggs, a slice of bread and a cup of tea (just over 5Eur each) which was to become oue morning ritual. Today’s walk to reach Dom Valentino Staniča pod Triglavom, named after the man who first accurately measured the height of Triglav, was only a three hour hike and a further 500m climb. Setting off we could see Dom Planika high above us but Triglav behind, was shrouded in mist. From Konjsko sedlo we traversed below the cliffs of Ržki podi and around Rž to descend slightly to the hut. What a wonderful position this hut commands, surrounded by high peaks yet accessible from the Kot and Vrata valleys and fine views across to the Karavanke on the Austrian border. After lunch we dumped our rucksacks and explored the nearby peak of Visoka Vrbanova špica (2408m). Later on in the evening, chatting with our host we discovered that we would be unable to stay at Triglavski Dom at Kredarica or Dom Planika on Saturday because they were fully booked. We would have to stay here another two nights.

Day Two stats – 4hrs walking, approx 600m of ascent.

Mountain huts in Slovenia

Vodnikov Dom
Vodnikov Dom

There are over 170 mountain huts in Slovenia, including huts (dom or koča), shelters and bivouacs , operated by 94 mountain clubs, under the umbrella organisation of the Planinske zveze Slovenije (PZS) or Alpine Association of Slovenia. Whilst the shelters and bivouacs have no provisions, the mountain huts cater for all needs of the walker and mountaineer, a roof over their heads, a bed, drink and food (a dom is usually larger than a koča with more beds). Some of the huts are found in the valleys at road-heads and on the slower slopes but there are many at higher altitudes in the mountains. Rarely are huts more than five hours apart which means some fantastic high-level routes are possible. It is worth pointing out here that wild camping is not permitted in Slovenia. We spent 12 days in the Julian Alps in September of 2009 – there is an account of our hut-to-hut walk in Slovenia here.

Zasavska Koča na Prehodavcih
Zasavska Koča na Prehodavcih

Some huts are open all year but the higher ones generally open in early June and close near the end of September.  In July and August the huts will be busy and we advise booking ahead.  In June and September it is quieter but we still recommend booking your Saturday night beds.  It may sound obvious but check that your chosen hut is open before you set off!  Although closed in winter some huts have “winter rooms” where you will find a bed and blankets.  Here is a list of all the huts in Slovenia.

Huts are graded into three categories. The actual classification is a bit complicated but generally Grade 1 are at high altitude, Grade 2 huts are lower and more easily accessible and Grade 3 are lowland valley huts.

Dormitory in Dom Planika
Dormitory in Dom Planika

Accommodation at the huts can be in simple rooms or, more cheaply, in a dormitory. The beds were always comfortable with clean sheets and enough blankets. We found that the extra expense of a room was rewarded by having some personal space and a good nights sleep! Take some earplugs if you think you might be sleeping in a dormitory – its guaranteed that at least one person will be snoring!

Prices for overnight accommodation are set by the PZS and are based on the hut grade.  The 2009 prices were as follows –

  • Grade 1, room with 1-4 beds – 27Eur
  • Grade 1, room with 5+ beds – 20Eur
  • Grade 1, dormitory bed – 18Eur
  • Grade 2, room with 1-4 beds – 20Eur
  • Grade 2, room with 5+ beds – 16Eur
  • Grade 2, dormitory bed – 12Eur

Money saving tip. We managed to save a lot by joining the British Mountaineering Council (BMC) and obtaining an Alpine Club Reciprocal Rights Card (make sure that you choose to become an Aspirant member of the Alpine Club). This card, when presented at registration at the hut entitles you to half price accommodation. Whether the card is worth paying for depends on how many nights you plan to stay in the huts – the card costs £40 (2009) for each person and then there is your club membership to consider.

Recommended kit on a hut-to-hut walk. In addition to the usual necessary walking equipment only a little extra is needed in order to stay in the huts. Just the basics are needed in the washing department as explained below.  A spare set of clothes to wear in the evening and a torch is advisable for use in the dormitories at night, but you will have one in your pack anyway.

Dom Valentina Staniča pod Triglavom
Dom Valentina Staniča pod Triglavom

Hut food is basic but wholesome, mostly thick soups, eggs, ham and sausage and delicious home made bread. Our favourite evening meal was ričet a delicious, spicy barley porridge, available with or without meat (brez mesa), and bread. For dessert it was a difficult choice between apple strudel and pancakes with jam! In the busier times the menu is more varied, the choice becoming more limited nearer the end of the season. There is always plenty of beer, spirits and bottled water to be purchased but we found that the most refreshing beverage is čaj, (aka “a nice cup of tea”). We had noticed that the flavour is slightly different at every hut and we were told it was because it is made from the petals of the wild flowers gathered at each location. Chocolate and biscuits are usually available too.

As many of the huts can only be serviced by helicopter, food is relatively expensive but prices for stews, tea and water are set by the PZS. For other beverages and meals the huts are free to set their own prices. To help you budget here are some example 2009 prices from Grade 1 huts –

  • A breakfast of two fried eggs, one slice of bread and a cup of tea was 5.30Eur
  • A cup of tea was 1.80Eur
  • An evening meal of ričet (without meat) and one slice of bread was 5.40Eur; desserts varied between 1.70 and 3Eur.

Food in Grade 2 huts is approximately 20% less. It may not be cheap but when you consider how the huts have to be supplied we think the prices are very reasonable.

Eating your own food in the huts is allowed but you cannot cook.

Do also remember that all money transactions will be in cash, so take plenty of Euros.

Triglavski Dom at Kredarica
Triglavski Dom at Kredarica

We found the huts to be warm and comfortable.  There will be somewhere to dry your clothes and a pair of slippers is provided.  Washing facilities vary!  Do not expect a shower (although we are told that some do exist, we have yet to find one), at best you may have a communal sink with cold water for hand/face wahing and teeth cleaning.  Toilet facilities are sometimes basic but usually clean.

The above information is based on our experiences and the PZS website (link above).  Unfortunately, the PZS do not provide an English translation but we use the Google Translator found on the Google Toolbar which can be used in IE or Firefox.  It is not perfect but you can get the gist!

Many of the walks in our book could easily be extended by using the huts for an overnight stay.  For instance, with Walk 21 to the Triglav Lakes Valley, spending the night at Koča pri Triglavskih Jezerih means that you could explore further up the valley or perhaps climb a nearby peak.  As another example, Walk 19 could be made a lot easier with an overnight stay at Dom Zorka Jelinčica on Črna prst.  Get out your maps, the possibilities are endless really!

Dom Zorka Jelincica hut on the summit of Črna prst
Dom Zorka Jelincica hut on the summit of Črna prst

24. Vogel, Bohinj, Slovenia

Walk 24 – Vogel, a mountain walk above Bohinj from a Walking Guide to Slovenia.

Triglav from the Vogel Ski Station
Triglav from the Vogel Ski Station

A relatively easy mountain walk above Bohinjin the Julian Alps, to the summit of Vogel (1922m). We use the Vogel Cable Car to gain a bit of height!

Start/Finish – Vogel Ski Station car park

Distance – 10km/6.2miles

Height gain – approx 650m

Time – 3h40min

Grade – fairly strenuous. A high-level mountain walk on waymarked paths, involving a little easy scrambling. Vogel is liable to lightning strikes; avoid if storms are forecast (see our mountain weather advice).

Recommended map(s) – are the 1:50 000 Triglavski Narodni Park or the Julijske Alpe vzhodni del (eastern) maps, published by PZS.  There is also the 1:25 000 Bohinjsko jezero map, again by PZS.

Equipment – Walking boots, walking sticks. See our clothing and walking equipment page for more recommendations.

Refreshments on route – At the Upper Cable Car Station; none on route.

Edelweiss
Edelweiss

Updates to the 2019, 5th EditionThere are no updates.

Public transport – The Cable Car Station is easily reached by bus.

Car parking in Bohinj – there is a parking charge at all car-parks beside or near Lake Bohinj. For more details see, our Bohinj information page.

Car parking is free for users of the Cable Car.

Nearest Town/VillageBohinjska Bistrica. In the town and nearby villages, including Ribčev Laz there is a wide range of hotels, apartments, guesthouses and rooms plus there are a couple of camping sites – Camp Danica at Bohinjska Bistrica is our favourite. The town also has a good range of shops too.

**Book Bohinj, Slovenia with Hostelbookers**

View towards Šija and Rodica from Vogel
View towards Šija and Rodica from Vogel

Please leave a comment below, or contact us, if you have some up to date information that you think might be useful or any suggestions to improve Slovenia-walking.